Retrophisch

Today’s @halfpricebooks find: large paperback edition of @wardlarsen’s first David Slaton book. Perfect for the re-read I have planned. (It’s been a long while.)

I have done something similar, with authors I know on Twitter, or have met in person. Given his productivity, @robkroese pretty much has his own shelf. twitter.com/David_JWe…

[laughingsquid:

‘Avenue of Literature’, Biloxi Teachers Turn Worn-Out School Lockers Into the Spines of Classic and Modern Books

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averypottermormon:

fangirltothefullest:

hiccupatheart:

mysharona1987:

stuffstuffstuffstuffstuffstuffst:

mysharona1987:

Funny library signs.

I kinda wanna know what happened with the oreos…

It’s a mystery of the universe.

Voldmort

I’m guessing the Oreo sign is because of this

this is wonderful

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chroniclebooks:

#GiveBooks this holiday!

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Been there, done that.

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ilovereadingandwriting:

All I Want To Do Is Read (by meganleestudio)

Yep.

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starwarschroniclebooks:

Don’t underestimate the power of reading… Pre-order your copy of Goodnight Darth Vader™ today! 

Click here to download a printable PDF of this poster on our blog.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdxC5xPlXGY?feature=oembed&enablejsapi=1&origin=https://safe.txmblr.com&wmode=opaque&w=250&h=141]

laughingsquid:

Cheer On Reading in Dallas, A Project to Bring 50 Little Free Libraries to Dallas

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instagram:

Exploring Dublin’s Long Room

To view more photos and videos from Dublin’s Trinity College Library, explore the Long Room location page.

Measuring 65 meters (213 feet) in length and housing more than 200,000 of Ireland’s oldest books, the Long Room at Trinity College Library in Dublin stands as a historical and cultural masterpiece.

The library is the largest in Ireland and dates back to the establishment of the university college in 1592. It holds more than 6 million printed works spanning 400 years.

The Long Room was originally built with a flat ceiling, but it was expanded to accommodate upper shelves and a gallery in the 1850s after the library was given legal deposit status in 1801, meaning it receives free copies of all material published in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

In addition to the numerous written works housed within the library, the Long Room also boasts marble busts of great philosophers, writers and artists as well as Ireland’s oldest harp.

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powells:

This one goes out to all the aspiring writers out there during Children’s Book Week. Don’t forget that you have the power to write your own stories, too! http://powells.us/1qzVd8b  

I will always love The Mouse and the Motorcycle.

8 Points to Consider When You Name Your Book

8 Points to Consider When You Name Your Book

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chroniclebooks:

5 Unforgettable Love Letters to Libraries

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chroniclebooks:

5 Unforgettable Love Letters to Libraries

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chroniclebooks:

Me too.

5 Unforgettable Love Letters to Libraries

Should really use our library more. Especially for the boys.

The first duty of the novelist is to entertain. It is a moral duty. People who read your books are sick, sad, traveling, in the hospital waiting room while someone is dying. Books are written by the alone for the alone.

Donna Tartt, author of The Secret History (via writewild)

No pressure or anything.

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chroniclebooks:

What is it about physical books that keeps us coming back for more? ALL THE FEELS.

Fatbrain breaks it down, infographic style.

Yep.

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mulhollanduncovered:

Books do make the best weapons! For arguments as well as, um, bashing.

Because: Stitch, and The Heat.

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“I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.” –Jorge Luis Borges

Free books: 100 legal sites to download literature   

Free books: 100 legal sites to download literature   

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dirtyriver:

dyingofcute:

http://freshome.com/2013/11/13/reading-can-fun-entertaining-creative-reading-net-playoffice/

Note to self: must adapt plans for future home library.

Read widely, and without apology. Read what you want to read, not what someone tells you you should read.
–Joyce Carol Oates

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chroniclebooks:

How to use your book for self-defense.

via How to Win at Everything 

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Books as physical objects matter to me, because they evoke the past. A Métro ticket falls out of a book I bought 40 years ago, and I am transported back to the Rue Saint-Jacques on Sept. 12, 1972, where I am waiting for someone named Annie LeCombe. A telephone message from a friend who died too young falls out of a book, and I find myself back in the Chateau Marmont on a balmy September day in 1995. A note I scribbled to myself in “Homage to Catalonia” in 1973 when I was in Granada reminds me to learn Spanish, which I have not yet done, and to go back to Granada.

None of this will work with a Kindle. People who need to possess the physical copy of a book, not merely an electronic version, believe that the objects themselves are sacred. Some people may find this attitude baffling, arguing that books are merely objects that take up space. This is true, but so are Prague and your kids and the Sistine Chapel. Think it through, bozos.

–Joe Queenan, in The Wall Street Journal